Policies

Norwich Pickleball Club Harassment Policy

Statement

 

Harassment is a term for a number of complaints including discrimination, bullying, victimisation and intimidation, and can have repercussions for the whole organisation.

 

Harassment can be defined as behaviour or remarks, which cause offence and which threaten, humiliate or embarrass.

 

Harassment is where there is unwanted conduct on the grounds of a personal characteristic or unwanted conduct of a personal nature and that conduct has the purpose or effect of violating a person’s dignity, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for them. There are nine personal characteristics under the Equality Act 2010. These are age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, and sexual orientation.

 

Harassment is often dismissed by those not suffering from it as “just a bit of fun” or “harmless”. However, victims of harassment often suffer from stress, depression, low self esteem, lack of motivation and confusion, any of which can have an adverse effect on job performance, attendance, staff turnover, morale and health.

 

Norwich Pickleball Club recognises that its members, management committee and partners may be victims of, or perpetrators of, violence and harassment. They have a duty to protect people from harassment, eradicate all forms of harassment and to take action where it is identified otherwise they can be held liable for the unlawful action of those who work in their organisation.

 

Aims

 

The aim of this policy is to prevent harassment, whether physical, sexual or mental and ensures a safe and non-threatening environment.

 

To provide members, management committee and partners who believe they have been subject to harassment and/or discrimination with a means to have that complaint addressed and to deal with those who are accused of breaching this policy.

 

Examples of unacceptable behaviour

 

  • Spreading malicious rumours, or insulting someone (particularly on the grounds of race, sex, disability, sexual orientation and religion or belief)
  • Copying emails, memos, correspondence that are critical about someone to others who do not need to know
  • Ridiculing or demeaning someone – picking on them or setting them up to fail
  • Exclusion or victimisation
  • Bullying
  • Unfair treatment
  • Overbearing supervision or other misuse of power or position
  • Unwelcome sexual advances
    • Comments about the way someone looks that they find demeaning
    • Indecent remarks
    • Questions about someone’s sex life
    • Sexual demands by a member of the same or the opposite sex
    • Display of offensive materials
    • Incidents involving touching and other physical threats are criminal offences and should also be reported to the police
  • Making threats or comments about job security without foundation
  • Deliberately undermining a competent worker by overloading and constant criticism
  • Preventing individuals progressing by internally blocking promotion or training opportunities
  • Unwelcome violent behaviour – shouting, physical contact that is deliberate to cause harm, threatening behaviour

 

This is not a definitive list of unacceptable behaviour and other comparable examples will fall within this policy.

 

Harassment by a Third Party

 

Previously, this applied only to sexual harassment. However, the 2010 Act extended prevention of harassment by third party to other protected characteristics (with the exception of marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity). This will apply where more than two occasions occur if an organisation is aware of the incidents (these are not necessarily same third party).

 

Action to prevent violence/harassment

 

All existing and new members and management committee will:

  • Be referred to a copy of this policy on joining
  • Will be involved in the review process of this policy
  • Will be advised of any amendments to the policy
  • Will receive training surrounding the policy upon request

 

All officials will receive training to raise awareness so that they are informed and understand how bullying, harassment, victimisation and violence could take place and what can be done to reduce the risk of this occurring.

 

Action

 

All complaints of harassment will be dealt with in a fair, confidential and sympathetic manner.

 

All allegations of harassment will be taken seriously.

 

If an employee wants to report an incident they should follow the Grievance Policy and Procedure.

 

All incidents of harassment must be reported to the Secretary or the Chairman. If the alleged perpetrator is either or both of these people then incidents should be reported to the Chair or other members of the Management Committee.

 

Any person reporting incidents of harassment has the right to have another person present, as does any person accused of harassment. This could be a fellow member or member of the public.

 

  1. The person being harassed must keep a diary of incidents so that these can be recalled accurately at any enquiry or tribunal. Violent incidents or near incidents should be noted on an email to the line manager for them to follow up. Physically violent incidents should be recorded in the Accident Book.

 

  1. Where the perpetrator is a member of the public, and a member is being harassed, then members will be offered support through supervision in reporting the incident to the police.

 

  • Where the perpetrator is a member, the incident may be treated as a disciplinary offence, the disciplinary panel of Management Committee may decide to suspend her/him whilst investigations are carried out.

 

A panel of the Management Committee will be formed to deal with all allegations and/or incidents of harassment. This group must meet within 10 days of the incident being reported. If the perpetrator is a member the Norwich Pickleball Club disciplinary process must be initiated if the allegations are confirmed.

 

The group must:

  • Keep all people involved informed of their actions.
  • Investigate the allegation of harassment
  • Offer the victim of harassment support
  • Advise the alleged perpetrator that the allegation has been made within 5 days
  • Agree a course of action to establish the facts
  • Decide on the action to be taken if the allegation is proven, this may involve invoking the disciplinary process

 

It is the responsibility of all members and management committee member not to practice or encourage any form of behaviour that may be viewed as harassment.

 

Norwich Pickleball Club takes the matter of harassment and bullying seriously and will seek to address valid complaints quickly and effectively. If, after investigation Norwich Pickleball Club deems the complaints made to be frivolous or malicious, they reserve the right to take disciplinary action against the complainant.

 

 

 

Legislation

 

The Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 created a criminal offence of intentional harassment. As harassment is not defined, all forms may be covered by the legislation. Convictions are punishable by imprisonment and/or a fine. Only harassment within a dwelling is exempt, therefore intentional harassment in the workplace would fall within the legislative provision.

 

Equality and Diversity

We aim to be an organisation that values, recognises and responds to the diverse needs of members and those we serve. We adhere to the Equality Act 2010 and will not discriminate against any person or other organisation with particular reference to the protected characteristics

 

 

This policy was approved by the Club’s Management Committee on 31st July 2017. It will be reviewed by the Management no later than 2019.

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Norwich Pickleball Club Child Protection Policy

 

  1. Child Protection Policy

Introduction

Everyone who participates in Norwich Pickleball Club is entitled to do so in an enjoyable and safe environment. The Norwich Pickleball Club have a moral and legal obligation to ensure that, when given responsibility for young people, coaches and volunteers provide them with the highest possible standard of care.

The Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to devising and implementing policies so that everyone in sport accepts their responsibilities to safeguard children from harm and abuse. This means to follow procedures to protect children and report any concerns about their welfare to appropriate authorities.

The aim of the policy is to promote good practice, providing children and young people with appropriate safety/protection whilst in the care of Norwich Pickleball Club and to allow members and volunteers to make informed and confident responses to specific child protection issues.

A child/young person is defined as a person under the age of 18 (Children’s Act 1989)

 

1.1       Policy Statement

The Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to the following:

  • the welfare of the child is paramount
  • all children, whatever their age, culture, ability, gender, language, racial origin, religious belief and/or

sexual identity should be able to participate in pickleball in a fun and safe environment

  • taking all reasonable steps to protect children from harm, discrimination and degrading treatment and to

respect their rights, wishes and feelings

  • all suspicions and allegations of poor practice or abuse will be taken seriously and responded to swiftly
  • all Norwich Pickleball Club members who work with children will be recruited with regard to their

suitability for that responsibility, and will be provided with guidance and/or training in good practice and

child protection procedures

  • working in partnership with parents and children is essential for the protection of children

 

1.2       Monitor and review the policy and procedures

The implementation of procedures should be regularly monitored and reviewed. The welfare officer should regularly report progress, challenges, difficulties, achievements gaps and areas where changes are required to the management committee.

The policy should be reviewed every 2 years or whenever there is a major change in the organisation or in relevant legislation.

 

2       Promoting Good Practice

2.1     Introduction

To provide children with the best possible experience and opportunities in pickleball everyone must operate within an accepted ethical framework such as The Coaches Code of Conduct.

It is not always easy to distinguish poor practice from abuse. It is therefore NOT the responsibility of members or participants in pickleball to make judgements about whether or not abuse is taking place. It is however their responsibility to identify poor practice and possible abuse and act if they have concerns about the welfare of the child, as explained in section 4.

This section will help you identify what is meant by good practice and poor practice.

2.2       Good Practice

All personnel should adhere to the following principles and action:

  • always work in an open environment (e.g. avoiding private or unobserved situations and encouraging

open communication with no secrets)

  • make the experience of pickleball fun and enjoyable: promote fairness, confront and deal with bullying
  • treat all young people equally and with respect and dignity
  • always put the welfare of the young person first, before winning
  • maintain a safe and appropriate distance with players (e.g. it is not appropriate for staff or volunteers to

have an intimate relationship with a child or to share a room with them)

  • Avoid unnecessary physical contact with young people. Where any form of manual/physical support is

required it should be provided openly and with the consent of the young person. Physical contact can be

appropriate so long as it is neither intrusive nor disturbing and the young person’s consent has been given

  • Involve parents/carers wherever possible, e.g. where young people need to be supervised in changing

rooms, encourage parents to take responsibility for their own child. If groups have to be supervised in

changing rooms always ensure parents, coaches etc work in pairs

  • request written parental consent if club officials are required to transport young people in their cars
  • gain written parental consent for any significant travel arrangements e.g. overnight stays
  • ensure that if mixed teams are taken away, they should always be accompanied by a male and female

member of staff

  • ensure that at away events adults should not enter a young person’s room or invite young people to their rooms

be an excellent role model, this includes not smoking or drinking alcohol in the company of young people

  • always give enthusiastic and constructive feedback rather than negative criticism
  • recognising the developmental needs and capacity of the young person and do not risk sacrificing welfare in a desire for club or personal achievements. This means avoiding excessive training or secure written parental consent for the club to act in loco parentis, to give permission for the administration of emergency first aid or other medical treatment if the need arises
  • keep a written record of any injury that occurs, along with details of any treatment given

2.3     Poor Practice

The following are regarded as poor practice and should be avoided by all personnel:

  • unnecessarily spending excessive amounts of time alone with young people away from others
  • taking young people alone in a car on journeys, however short
  • taking young people to your home where they will be alone with you
  • sharing a room with a young person
  • engaging in rough, physical or sexually provocative games, including horseplay
  • allow or engage in inappropriate touching of any form
  • allowing young people to use inappropriate language unchallenged
  • making sexually suggestive comments to a young person, even in fun
  • reducing a young person to tears as a form of control
  • allow allegations made by a young person to go unchallenged, unrecorded or not acted upon
  • do things of a personal nature that the young person can do for themselves

When a case arises where it is impractical/impossible to avoid certain situation e.g. transporting a young person on your car, the tasks should only be carried out with the full understanding and consent of the parent/ care and the young person involved.

If during your care you accidentally hurt a young person, the young person seems distressed in any manner, appears to be sexually aroused by your actions and/or if the young person misunderstands or misinterprets something you have done, report any such incidents as soon as possible to another colleague and make a written note of it. Parents should also be informed of the incident.

3       Defining Child Abuse

3.1     Introduction

Child abuse is any form of physical, emotional or sexual mistreatment or lack of care that leads to injury or harm, it commonly occurs within a relationship of trust or responsibility and is an abuse of power or a breach of trust. Abuse can happen to a young person regardless of their age, gender, race or ability.

There are four main types of abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect. The abuser may be a family member, someone the young person encounters in residential care or in the community, including sports and leisure activities. Any individual may abuse or neglect a young person directly, or may be responsible for abuse because they fail to prevent another person harming the young person.

Abuse in all of its forms can affect a young person at any age. The effects can be so damaging that if not treated may follow the individual into adulthood.

Young people with disabilities may be at increased risk of abuse through various factors such as stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination, isolation and a powerlessness to protect themselves or adequately communicate that abuse had occurred.

3.2     Types of Abuse

Physical Abuse: where adults physically hurt or injure a young person e.g. hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning, biting, scalding, suffocating, drowning. Giving young people alcohol or inappropriate drugs would also constitute child abuse.

This category of abuse can also include when a parent/carer reports non-existent symptoms or illness deliberately causes ill health in a young person they are looking after. This is call Munchauser’s syndrome by proxy.

In a sports situation, physical abuse may occur when the nature and intensity of training disregard the capacity of the child’s immature and growing body

Emotional Abuse: the persistent emotional ill treatment of a young person, likely to cause severe and lasting adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve telling a young person they are useless, worthless, unloved, inadequate or valued in terms of only meeting the needs of another person. It may feature expectations of young people that are not appropriate to their age or development.

It may cause a young person to be frightened or in danger by being constantly shouted at, threatened or taunted which may make the young person frightened or withdrawn.

Ill treatment of children, whatever form it takes, will always feature a degree of emotional abuse.

Emotional abuse in sport may occur when the young person is constant criticised, given negative feedback, expected to perform at levels that are above their capability. Other forms of emotional abuse could take the form of name calling and bullying.

Bullying may come from another young person or an adult. Bullying is defined as deliberate hurtful behaviour, usually repeated over a period of time, where it is difficult for those bullied to defend themselves. There are three main types of bullying.

It may be physical (e.g. hitting, kicking, slapping), verbal (e.g. racist or homophobic remarks, name calling, graffiti, threats, abusive text messages), emotional (e.g. tormenting, ridiculing, humiliating, ignoring, isolating form the group), or sexual (e.g. unwanted physical contact or abusive comments).

In sport bullying may arise when a parent or coach pushes the young person too hard to succeed, or a rival athlete or official uses bullying behaviour.

Neglect occurs when an adult fails to meet the young person’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, to an extent that is likely to result in serious impairment of the child’s health or development. For example, failing to provide adequate food, shelter and clothing, failing to protect from physical harm or danger, or failing to ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.

Refusal to give love, affection and attention can also be a form of neglect.

Neglect in sport could occur when a coach does not keep the young person safe, or exposing them to undue cold/heat or unnecessary risk of injury.

Sexual Abuse occurs when adults (male and female) use children to meet their own sexual needs. This could include full sexual intercourse, masturbation, oral sex, anal intercourse and fondling. Showing young people pornography or talking to them in a sexually explicit manner are also forms of sexual abuse.

In sport, activities which might involve physical contact with young people could potentially create situations where sexual abuse may go unnoticed. Also the power of the coach over young athletes, if misused, may lead to abusive situations developing.

3.3     Indicators of Abuse

Even for those experienced in working with child abuse, it is not always easy to recognise a situation where abuse may occur or has already taken place. Most people are not experts in such recognition, but indications that a child is being abused may include one or more of the following:

  • unexplained or suspicious injuries such as bruising, cuts or burns, particularly if situated on a part of the body not normally prone to such injuries
  • an injury for which an explanation seems inconsistent
  • the young person describes what appears to be an abusive act involving them
  • another young person or adult expresses concern about the welfare of a young person
  • unexplained changes in a young person’s behavior e.g. becoming very upset, quiet, withdrawn or

displaying sudden outbursts of temper

  • inappropriate sexual awareness
  • engaging in sexually explicit behaviour
  • distrust of adult’s, particularly those whom a close relationship would normally be expected
  • difficulty in making friends
  • being prevented from socialising with others
  • displaying variations in eating patterns including over eating or loss of appetite
  • losing weight for no apparent reason
  • becoming increasingly dirty or unkempt

 Signs of bullying include:

  • behavioural changes such as reduced concentration and/or becoming withdrawn, clingy, depressed,
  • tearful, emotionally up and down, reluctance to go training or competitions
  • an unexplained drop off in performance
  • physical signs such as stomach aches, headaches, difficulty in sleeping, bed wetting, scratching and bruising, damaged clothes, bingeing e.g. on food, alcohol or cigarettes
  • a shortage of money or frequents loss of possessions

It must be recognised that the above list is not exhaustive, but also that the presence of one or more of the

indications is not proof that abuse is taking place. It is NOT the responsibility of those working in Norwich

Pickleball Club to decide that child abuse is occurring. It IS their responsibility to act on any concerns

 


 

Norwich Pickleball Club Complaints and Policies Procedure

  1. Child Protection Policy

Introduction

Everyone who participates in Norwich Pickleball Club is entitled to do so in an enjoyable and safe environment. The Norwich Pickleball Club have a moral and legal obligation to ensure that, when given responsibility for young people, coaches and volunteers provide them with the highest possible standard of care.

The Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to devising and implementing policies so that everyone in sport accepts their responsibilities to safeguard children from harm and abuse. This means to follow procedures to protect children and report any concerns about their welfare to appropriate authorities.

The aim of the policy is to promote good practice, providing children and young people with appropriate safety/protection whilst in the care of Norwich Pickleball Club and to allow members and volunteers to make informed and confident responses to specific child protection issues.

A child/young person is defined as a person under the age of 18 (Children’s Act 1989)

 

1.1       Policy Statement

The Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to the following:

  • the welfare of the child is paramount
  • all children, whatever their age, culture, ability, gender, language, racial origin, religious belief and/or

sexual identity should be able to participate in pickleball in a fun and safe environment

  • taking all reasonable steps to protect children from harm, discrimination and degrading treatment and to

respect their rights, wishes and feelings

  • all suspicions and allegations of poor practice or abuse will be taken seriously and responded to swiftly
  • all Norwich Pickleball Club members who work with children will be recruited with regard to their

suitability for that responsibility, and will be provided with guidance and/or training in good practice and

child protection procedures

  • working in partnership with parents and children is essential for the protection of children

 

1.2       Monitor and review the policy and procedures

The implementation of procedures should be regularly monitored and reviewed. The welfare officer should regularly report progress, challenges, difficulties, achievements gaps and areas where changes are required to the management committee.

The policy should be reviewed every 2 years or whenever there is a major change in the organisation or in relevant legislation.

 

2       Promoting Good Practice

2.1     Introduction

To provide children with the best possible experience and opportunities in pickleball everyone must operate within an accepted ethical framework such as The Coaches Code of Conduct.

It is not always easy to distinguish poor practice from abuse. It is therefore NOT the responsibility of members or participants in pickleball to make judgements about whether or not abuse is taking place. It is however their responsibility to identify poor practice and possible abuse and act if they have concerns about the welfare of the child, as explained in section 4.

This section will help you identify what is meant by good practice and poor practice.

2.2       Good Practice

All personnel should adhere to the following principles and action:

  • always work in an open environment (e.g. avoiding private or unobserved situations and encouraging

open communication with no secrets)

  • make the experience of pickleball fun and enjoyable: promote fairness, confront and deal with bullying
  • treat all young people equally and with respect and dignity
  • always put the welfare of the young person first, before winning
  • maintain a safe and appropriate distance with players (e.g. it is not appropriate for staff or volunteers to

have an intimate relationship with a child or to share a room with them)

  • Avoid unnecessary physical contact with young people. Where any form of manual/physical support is

required it should be provided openly and with the consent of the young person. Physical contact can be

appropriate so long as it is neither intrusive nor disturbing and the young person’s consent has been given

  • Involve parents/carers wherever possible, e.g. where young people need to be supervised in changing

rooms, encourage parents to take responsibility for their own child. If groups have to be supervised in

changing rooms always ensure parents, coaches etc work in pairs

  • request written parental consent if club officials are required to transport young people in their cars
  • gain written parental consent for any significant travel arrangements e.g. overnight stays
  • ensure that if mixed teams are taken away, they should always be accompanied by a male and female

member of staff

  • ensure that at away events adults should not enter a young person’s room or invite young people to their rooms

be an excellent role model, this includes not smoking or drinking alcohol in the company of young people

  • always give enthusiastic and constructive feedback rather than negative criticism
  • recognising the developmental needs and capacity of the young person and do not risk sacrificing welfare in a desire for club or personal achievements. This means avoiding excessive training or secure written parental consent for the club to act in loco parentis, to give permission for the administration of emergency first aid or other medical treatment if the need arises
  • keep a written record of any injury that occurs, along with details of any treatment given

2.3     Poor Practice

The following are regarded as poor practice and should be avoided by all personnel:

  • unnecessarily spending excessive amounts of time alone with young people away from others
  • taking young people alone in a car on journeys, however short
  • taking young people to your home where they will be alone with you
  • sharing a room with a young person
  • engaging in rough, physical or sexually provocative games, including horseplay
  • allow or engage in inappropriate touching of any form
  • allowing young people to use inappropriate language unchallenged
  • making sexually suggestive comments to a young person, even in fun
  • reducing a young person to tears as a form of control
  • allow allegations made by a young person to go unchallenged, unrecorded or not acted upon
  • do things of a personal nature that the young person can do for themselves

When a case arises where it is impractical/impossible to avoid certain situation e.g. transporting a young person on your car, the tasks should only be carried out with the full understanding and consent of the parent/ care and the young person involved.

If during your care you accidentally hurt a young person, the young person seems distressed in any manner, appears to be sexually aroused by your actions and/or if the young person misunderstands or misinterprets something you have done, report any such incidents as soon as possible to another colleague and make a written note of it. Parents should also be informed of the incident.

3       Defining Child Abuse

3.1     Introduction

Child abuse is any form of physical, emotional or sexual mistreatment or lack of care that leads to injury or harm, it commonly occurs within a relationship of trust or responsibility and is an abuse of power or a breach of trust. Abuse can happen to a young person regardless of their age, gender, race or ability.

There are four main types of abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect. The abuser may be a family member, someone the young person encounters in residential care or in the community, including sports and leisure activities. Any individual may abuse or neglect a young person directly, or may be responsible for abuse because they fail to prevent another person harming the young person.

Abuse in all of its forms can affect a young person at any age. The effects can be so damaging that if not treated may follow the individual into adulthood.

Young people with disabilities may be at increased risk of abuse through various factors such as stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination, isolation and a powerlessness to protect themselves or adequately communicate that abuse had occurred.

3.2     Types of Abuse

Physical Abuse: where adults physically hurt or injure a young person e.g. hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning, biting, scalding, suffocating, drowning. Giving young people alcohol or inappropriate drugs would also constitute child abuse.

This category of abuse can also include when a parent/carer reports non-existent symptoms or illness deliberately causes ill health in a young person they are looking after. This is call Munchauser’s syndrome by proxy.

In a sports situation, physical abuse may occur when the nature and intensity of training disregard the capacity of the child’s immature and growing body.

Emotional Abuse: the persistent emotional ill treatment of a young person, likely to cause severe and lasting adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve telling a young person they are useless, worthless, unloved, inadequate or valued in terms of only meeting the needs of another person. It may feature expectations of young people that are not appropriate to their age or development.

It may cause a young person to be frightened or in danger by being constantly shouted at, threatened or taunted which may make the young person frightened or withdrawn.

Ill treatment of children, whatever form it takes, will always feature a degree of emotional abuse.

Emotional abuse in sport may occur when the young person is constant criticised, given negative feedback, expected to perform at levels that are above their capability. Other forms of emotional abuse could take the form of name calling and bullying.

Bullying may come from another young person or an adult. Bullying is defined as deliberate hurtful behaviour, usually repeated over a period of time, where it is difficult for those bullied to defend themselves. There are three main types of bullying.

It may be physical (e.g. hitting, kicking, slapping), verbal (e.g. racist or homophobic remarks, name calling, graffiti, threats, abusive text messages), emotional (e.g. tormenting, ridiculing, humiliating, ignoring, isolating form the group), or sexual (e.g. unwanted physical contact or abusive comments).

In sport bullying may arise when a parent or coach pushes the young person too hard to succeed, or a rival athlete or official uses bullying behaviour.

Neglect occurs when an adult fails to meet the young person’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, to an extent that is likely to result in serious impairment of the child’s health or development. For example, failing to provide adequate food, shelter and clothing, failing to protect from physical harm or danger, or failing to ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.

Refusal to give love, affection and attention can also be a form of neglect.

Neglect in sport could occur when a coach does not keep the young person safe, or exposing them to undue cold/heat or unnecessary risk of injury.

Sexual Abuse occurs when adults (male and female) use children to meet their own sexual needs. This could include full sexual intercourse, masturbation, oral sex, anal intercourse and fondling. Showing young people pornography or talking to them in a sexually explicit manner are also forms of sexual abuse.

In sport, activities which might involve physical contact with young people could potentially create situations where sexual abuse may go unnoticed. Also the power of the coach over young athletes, if misused, may lead to abusive situations developing.

3.3     Indicators of Abuse

Even for those experienced in working with child abuse, it is not always easy to recognise a situation where abuse may occur or has already taken place. Most people are not experts in such recognition, but indications that a child is being abused may include one or more of the following:

  • unexplained or suspicious injuries such as bruising, cuts or burns, particularly if situated on a part of the body not normally prone to such injuries
  • an injury for which an explanation seems inconsistent
  • the young person describes what appears to be an abusive act involving them
  • another young person or adult expresses concern about the welfare of a young person
  • unexplained changes in a young person’s behavior e.g. becoming very upset, quiet, withdrawn or

displaying sudden outbursts of temper

  • inappropriate sexual awareness
  • engaging in sexually explicit behaviour
  • distrust of adult’s, particularly those whom a close relationship would normally be expected
  • difficulty in making friends
  • being prevented from socialising with others
  • displaying variations in eating patterns including over eating or loss of appetite
  • losing weight for no apparent reason
  • becoming increasingly dirty or unkempt

 Signs of bullying include:

  • behavioural changes such as reduced concentration and/or becoming withdrawn, clingy, depressed,

tearful, emotionally up and down, reluctance to go training or competitions

  • an unexplained drop off in performance
  • physical signs such as stomach aches, headaches, difficulty in sleeping, bed wetting, scratching and

bruising, damaged clothes, bingeing e.g. on food, alcohol or cigarettes

 

  • a shortage of money or frequents loss of possessions

It must be recognised that the above list is not exhaustive, but also that the presence of one or more of the

indications is not proof that abuse is taking place. It is NOT the responsibility of those working in Norwich

Pickleball Club to decide that child abuse is occurring. It IS their responsibility to act on any concerns

 

…………………………………………

Norwich Pickleball Club Data Protection Policy

 

Norwich Pickleball Club is a ‘not for profit’ organisation which holds and processes information about members, sponsors and other data subjects for fundraising and administrative purposes. When handling such information, the Club, and all its officers, members or others who process or use any personal information, must comply with the Data Protection Principles which are set out in the Data Protection Act 1998 (the Act). In summary these state that personal data shall:

  1. be processed fairly and lawfully
  2. be obtained for a specified and lawful purpose and shall not be processed in any manner incompatible with the purpose
  3. be adequate, relevant and not excessive for the purpose
  4. be accurate and up‐to‐date
  5. not be kept for longer than necessary for the purpose
  6. be processed in accordance with the data subject’s rights
  7. be kept safe from unauthorised processing, and accidental loss, damage or destruction
  8. not be transferred to a country outside the European Economic Area, unless that country has equivalent levels of protection for personal data, except in specified circumstances

Definitions

  1. A “Data Controller” is a person who alone, jointly or in common with other persons within the Club, determines the purposes for which and the manner in which any personal data are processed or are to be processed. Within the Club, the Management Committee are jointly the Club’s Data Controller, represented in data protection issues by the Club’s Data Protection Officer.
  2. “Officials” include anyone who holds or processes information on behalf of the Club. However, it also includes all those involved in working on the Club’s behalf on committees or organising events at local level.
  3. “Members” are those who are members of the Club, or associated with it, and who’s personal data may be held by the Club. This may include past, present and potential members.
  4. “Officials”, “Members”, “Others” and “Third Parties” may include contractors, suppliers, contacts, referees, friends or family members.
  5. “Processing” refers to any action involving personal information, including obtaining, viewing, copying, amending, adding, deleting , extracting, storing, disclosing or destroying information.

 

Notification of Data Held

  1. The Club shall notify all officials, members and other relevant data subjects of the types of data held and processed by the Club concerning them, and the reasons for which it is processed. When processing for a new or different purpose is introduced, the individuals affected by that change will be informed through the Club Data Protection Officer.

 

Officials’ Responsibilities

  1. All Officials of the Club who hold or process information about Members or Other Data Subjects (for example, membership information, event booking information or other personal details), they must comply with the Club’s Data Protection Guidelines.
  2. Officials holding data shall ensure that:
  3. all personal information is kept securely;
  4. personal information is not disclosed either orally or in writing, accidentally or
  5. otherwise to any unauthorised third party. Unauthorised disclosure is likely to be considered a matter which is ‘injurious to the character of the Club’ and may in some cases lead to expulsion from the Club.

 

Members’ Responsibilities

  1. All members shall:
    1. ensure that all personal information which they provide to the Club is accurate and up‐to‐date;
    2. inform the Club of any changes to that information, for example, changes of address;
    3. check the information which the Club shall make available from time to time, in written or automated form, and inform the Club of any errors or, where appropriate, follow procedures for up‐dating entries on computer forms. The Club cannot be held responsible for errors of which it has not been informed.

 

 

Rights to Access Information

  1. Officials, members and other data subjects in the Club have the right to access any personal data that is being kept about them either on computer or in structured and accessible manual files. Any person may exercise this right by submitting a request in writing to the Club Data Protection Officer.
  2. The Club reserves the right to make a nominal charge for each official Subject Access Request under the Act but is unlikely to do so in practice.
  3. The Club aims to comply with requests for access to personal information as quickly as possible, but will ensure that it is provided within 14 days unless there is good reason for delay.
  4. In such cases, the reason for the delay will be explained in writing by the Club’s Data Protection Officer to the data subject making the request.
  5. Subject Consent –the Club will not handle sensitive personal data and therefore individual consent for the Club to hold or process personal data is not required. Nevertheless, all members will be invited to sign their application form on joining the Club to acknowledge that the Club will hold and process such data.

 

The Data Controller and the Designated Data Controllers

  1. The Management Committee are jointly the Data Controller under the Act, and the Club Secretary is ultimately responsible for implementation. Responsibility for day‐to‐day matters will be delegated to the Data Protection Officer, from whom information and advice about the holding and processing of personal information is available.

 

Retention of Data

  1. The Club will keep different types of information for differing lengths of time, depending on legal, operational and archive requirements. These requirements are described in the Club’s Records Retention Schedule.

 

Compliance

  1. Compliance with the Act is the responsibility of all Club officials and members. Any deliberate or reckless breach of this Policy may lead to legal proceedings. Any questions or concerns about the interpretation or operation of this policy should be taken up with the Data Protection Officer.
  2. Any individual, who considers that the policy has not been followed in respect of personal data about him or herself, should raise the matter initially with their Director (as Data Controller).

 

This policy was approved by the Club’s Management Committee on 31st July 2017. It will be reviewed by the Management no later than 2019.

 

As defined in the Data Protection Act (1998)

 

————————————————–

Norwich Pickleball Club Data Protection Statement

 

Norwich Pickleball Club is a ‘not for profit’ organization which holds and processes information about members, sponsors and other data subjects for administrative purposes. We are governed by the 1998 Data Protection Act in all we do and are bound by the Data Protection Principles that are set out in the Act.

 

As a ‘not for profit’ organization, we are not required to ‘notify’ details of data holdings and the purposes of our data processing to the Information Commissioner. Nevertheless, we still need to meet the full requirements of the Data Protection Act in how we hold, care for, use and dispose of your personal information.

 

The Data Controllers for the Club are the Management Committee, each responsible for their own areas. They are advised by and represented in data protection issues by the Club’s Data Protection Officer who is the current Club Secretary.

 

The purposes for which we hold and process your information are:

 

*Managing the membership of new and existing members.

*Organizing Club events.

*The management of relevant internal elections.

*Advertising, marketing and public relations.

*Accounts and records.

 

November 2016

 

NPC Data Protection Policy was agreed by the committee 31/07/17

 


 

Norwich Pickleball Club Equality and Diversity Policy

 

Statement of Purpose

 

Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to meeting the needs and aspirations of customers and communities in a fair, respectful, and proportionate manner. Our approach to diversity and equality is to promote inclusiveness by recognising that anyone, can make a positive difference in the achievement of the organisation’s vision and in the wider society.

 

The policy is linked to our vision, values and business plans. Strategies and action plans will be used to realise and deliver our policy aims. This is our framework of continuous improvement and learning.

 

 
Our Approach

 

1.1 The policy applies to everyone the organisation serves, who works for it, applies for work or who provides services to it. Diversity and equality are integral to all aspects of our work.
   
1.2 We will comply with best practice from legal, regulatory and inspection requirements. Codes of Practice and other guidance will be used appropriately to ensure progress on diversity.
   
1.3 Norwich Pickleball Club will not discriminate against, bully or victimise any person or organisation on grounds of, race, ethnic origin, nationality, religion or belief, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, age, class, appearance, responsibility for dependants or any other protected characteristics under the 2010 Equality Act or any other matter which causes a person to be treated with injustice.
   
Principles

 

2.1 To demonstrate our commitment to diversity and equality, working to eliminating all forms of discrimination whether covered in law or not.
   
2.2 To raise awareness, recognise and celebrate our successes, forming a platform for continuous learning and improvement.
   
2.3 To have a greater and deeper understanding of our members and partners enabling them to influence what we do.
   
2.4 To have a proportionate number of outcomes and goals for the size of the organisation to ensure all stated outcomes are delivered without exception.
   
2.5 To listen to all members and partners through a range of mechanisms to assess satisfaction levels across various groups to ensure parity of outcomes.
   
2.6 To have Committee members and members that reflect the makeup of the communities we serve.
   
2.7 To work in inclusive ways in developing an organisational culture that proactively promotes diversity and equality.
   
2.8 To ensure the Committee and members are supported and trained in knowledge and skills to deliver our policy on diversity and equality.
   
Roles and Responsibilities

 

3.1 Anyone representing Norwich Pickleball Club has to abide by all policies and procedures of the organisation. This includes ALL members.
   
3.2 The Committee’s leadership role will ensure the policy is successful by demonstrating their commitment and action to share our policy objectives on diversity.
   
Implementation, Monitoring, Review and Evaluation

 

4.1 Committee reviews will be linked to this policy and the performance in the organisation.
   
4.2 The Committee will monitor progress on this policy, providing a focus internally for members.
   
4.3 Annual reviews will build on previous performance.   The overall impact of the policy will be evaluated at the end of the 2 year cycle to make further continuous improvements.
   
5                Procedure for Dealing with Breaches of this Policy

 

Any breach of this policy, intended or accidental, is not acceptable. Infringements of this policy will be dealt with seriously as disciplinary matter under Norwich Pickleball Club’s normal disciplinary procedures and may involve either informal or formal action depending on the seriousness of the case.

 
Equality and Diversity
We aim to be an organisation that values, recognises and responds to the diverse needs of members and those we serve. We adhere to the Equality Act 2010 and will not discriminate against any person or other organisation with particular reference to the protected characteristics
 
Monitoring and Review
The Committee will regularly review the operation of this policy.
 

 

Appendix 1

 

Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to equal opportunities. It is an integral part of our work and of our overall growth and development. Therefore, before any action is taken, it must be measured against this policy and the equal opportunities implications.

 

Membership Policy

 

  • Positive steps should be taken to encourage as wide a membership as possible
  • Structures and conditions of membership should be kept to a minimum to make the organisation accessible to minority and grass root groups
  • Positive action should be taken to reach out to minority or disadvantaged groups to let them know we want to work with them
  • All meetings and training sessions must be held in accessible buildings
  • Papers for meetings should be available on tape or in Braille for people with visual handicap
  • Non-Sexist language and titles should be used.

 

Committee

 

  • Steps should be taken to ensure a wide mix of people on the Committee.
  • People from ethnic minority groups should be encouraged to stand
  • People with disabilities should be encouraged to stand
  • Meetings must always be held in rooms that are accessible to people with a wide range of handicaps
  • All committee papers should be available on tape or in Braille if necessary
  • Timing of meetings should not exclude certain groups of people from being able to participate
  • Obvious gaps in membership should be filled if at all possible by co-option

 

  • All new Committee members should be offered and encouraged to attend training in skills and responsibilities of committee members.

      

 

                                                                                                                                      

Volunteers

 

Norwich Pickleball Club recognises that everyone has the right to be a volunteer but not necessarily the right to do every sort of voluntary work.

  • Volunteers working directly for Norwich Pickleball Club should be given a role description and know to whom they are responsible
  • Volunteers should have the right to receive training

 

 

Equality Act 2010

 

The Act brought together into one piece of legislation and replaced all previous discrimination legislation. It provides that a person shall not be discriminated against, i.e. treated less favourably, on grounds of nine protected characteristics These are age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, and sexual orientation.

 

This policy was approved by the Club’s Management Committee on 31st July 2017. It will be reviewed by the Management no later than 2019.

 


 

Norwich Pickleball Club Risk Assessment

 

Risk Assessment

This risk assessment covers Wensum Sports, Sprowston Recreation Tennis Courts and Waterloo park.

Change of venue or procedures to the above sites will require a new risk assessment or

to modifying and update this document.

 

  1. Pickleball is a paddle and ball game played on a court forty-four feet long by twenty feet wide with a thirty-six inches high net across the centre . Played as singles or doubles, both indoors and outdoors.

 

  1. Indoor courts have a variety of floor surfaces, which may include a sprung and solid wooden surfaces or concrete with vinyl top layer. The top layer finish is a nonslip coating. Other types of floor construction and top layers will be in use in other sports halls. This affects the grip on court shoes and impact on joints in play. Space between courts and behind the base lines can also vary. Some sports facilities may segregate pickleball play from other courts by using a curtain or other devices.

 

  1. The Norwich Pickleball Club plays by the International Federation of Pickleball rules. Club paddles and balls meet their specifications. The paddle is seventeen inches overall in length and weighs approximately seven and ten ounces. The construction can be solid or composite, including wood, aluminium, fibre glass,

carbon or graphite. The ball is hollow plastic, three inches in diameter with up to forty holes spaced around it and weighs just under one ounce, tournament and outdoor balls may be made of a harder plastic which can increase the speed of the ball and game. The net is normally free standing on metal posts thirty-six inches high at the posts. The posts are positioned outside the sidelines at the centre of the court. Badminton posts may be used, these are taller and have counter weights to maintain their position the net tied off at thirty-six inches high.

 

  1. Players can vary widely in age and ability. Because of the reduced size of court pickleball suits ex -tennis and other racquet sport players who have restricted mobility and stamina.

 

  1. Session Leaders will undertake training for their role and have a full knowledge of the procedures of the Norwich Pickleball Club and Wensum Sports Centre or any other sport venue that the club may use.
  • Fire Alarm System :- Siren
  • Fire Extinguishers :- Various types are located around the sports hall
  • Evacuation Routes :- Assembly Area Car Park
  • Public Address System :- Located Reception Office
  • First Aid and ice packs :- Located Reception Office ( Small Kit in NPC sports bag)
  • Incident Reporting System. :- Located Reception Office
  • NPC Any Incident, safety issue or damage to club equipment to report to a club committee member or use incident report sheet.
  • Wensum Sports equipment and facilities – report all defects to staff

 

  1. Norwich Pickleball Club Code of Conduct will apply at all times All members and visitors should respect these values and court etiquette while playing with NPC

 

Norwich Pickleball Club Safeguarding Adults Procedures

 

Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to creating and maintaining a safe and positive environment and accepts

our responsibility to safeguard the welfare of all adults involved in Norwich Pickleball Club in accordance with

the Care Act 2014.

Norwich Pickleball Club safeguarding adults policy and procedures apply to all individuals involved in

Norwich Pickleball Club.

Norwich Pickleball Club will encourage and support partner organizations, including clubs, counties, suppliers,

and sponsors to adopt and demonstrate their commitment to the principles and practice of equality as set out in

this safeguarding adults policy and procedures.

Index:

Introduction

Principles…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

  1. Guidance and Legislation ……………………………………………………………………………
  2. Definitions………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
  3. Types of abuse and neglect…………………………………………………………………………………
  4. Signs and indicators of abuse……………………………………………………………………….
  5. What to do if you have a concern…………………………………………………………………
  6. How to record a disclosure………………………………………………………………………….
  7. Safeguarding Adults Flow Chart …………………………………………………………………………
  8. Roles and responsibilities……………………………………………………………………………………
  9. Good practice, poor practice and abuse ……………………………………………………….
  10. Relevant policies ………………………………………………………………………………………………..
  11. Further Information……………………………………………………………………………………

13.

  • Appendix 1 – Incident Report Form
  • Appendix 2 – Legislation and Government Initiatives
  • Appendix 3 – Useful Contacts

2.1 Principles

2.1 The guidance given in the policy and procedures is based on the

following principles:

The six principles of adult safeguarding

The Care Act sets out the following principles that should underpin safeguarding of adults

Empowerment – People being supported and encouraged to make their own decisions and informed consent.

“I am asked what I want as the outcomes from the safeguarding process and these directly inform what

happens.”

Prevention – It is better to take action before harm occurs.

“I receive clear and simple information about what abuse is, how to recognize the signs and what I can do to

seek help.”

Proportionality – The least intrusive response appropriate to the risk presented.

“I am sure that the professionals will work in my interest, as I see them and they will only get involved as

much as needed.”

Protection – Support and representation for those in greatest need.

“I get help and support to report abuse and neglect. I get help so that I am able to take part in the

safeguarding process to the extent to which I want.”

Partnership – Local solutions through services working with their communities. Communities have a part to

play in preventing, detecting and reporting neglect and abuse

“I know that staff treat any personal and sensitive information in confidence, only sharing what is helpful

and necessary. I am confident that professionals will work together and with me to get the best result for

me.”

Accountability – Accountability and transparency in delivering safeguarding.

“I understand the role of everyone involved in my life and so do they.”

2.1.2 All adults, regardless of age, ability or disability, gender, race, religion, ethnic origin, sexual

orientation, marital or gender status have the right to be protected from abuse and poor practice

and to participate in an enjoyable and safe environment.

2.1.3 Norwich Pickleball Club will seek to ensure that our sport is inclusive and make reasonable

adjustments for any ability, disability or impairment, we will also commit to continuous

development, monitoring and review.

2.1.4 The rights, dignity and worth of all adults will always be respected.

2.1.5 We recognize that ability and disability can change over time, such that some

adults may be additionally vulnerable to abuse, for example those who have a dependency on

others or have different communication needs.

2.1.6 We recognize that a disabled adult may or may not identify themselves or be identified

as an adult ‘at risk’.

2.1.7 We all have a shared responsibility to ensure the safety and well-being of all adults and will

act appropriately and report concerns whether these concerns arise within Norwich Pickleball

Club for example inappropriate behavior of a coach, or in the wider community.

2.1.8 All allegations will be taken seriously and responded to quickly in line with Norwich

Pickleball Club Safeguarding Adults Policy and Procedures.

2.1.9 Norwich Pickleball Club recognizes the role and responsibilities of the statutory agencies in

safeguarding adults and is committed to complying with the procedures of the Local Safeguarding

Adults Boards.

3 Guidance and Legislation

3.1 The practices and procedures within this policy are based on the principles contained within the

UK and legislation and Government Guidance and have been developed to complement the

Safeguarding Adults Boards policy and procedures, and take the following into consideration:

  • The Care Act 2014
  • The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012
  • Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims (Amendment ) Act 2012

The Equality Act 2010

  • The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006
  • Mental Capacity Act 2005
  • Sexual Offences Act 2003
  • The Human Rights Act 1998
  • The Data Protection Act 1994 and 1998

4 Definitions

4.1 To assist working through and understanding this policy a number of

key definitions need to be explained:

4.1.1 Adult at Risk is a person aged 18 or over who is in need of care and support regardless of

whether they are receiving them, and because of those needs are unable to protect themselves

against abuse or neglect.

In recent years there has been a marked shift away from using the term ‘vulnerable’ to describe

adults potentially at risk from harm or abuse.

4.1.2 Abuse is a violation of an individual’s human and civil rights by another

person or persons. See section 5 for further explanations.

4.1.3 Adult is anyone aged 18 or over.

4.1.4 Adult safeguarding is protecting a person’s right to live in safety, free from abuse and

neglect.

4.1.5 Capacity refers to the ability to make a decision at a particular time,

for example when under considerable stress. The starting assumption must always be that a person

has the capacity to make a decision unless it can be established that they lack capacity (MCA

2005).

5 Types of Abuse and Neglect – Definitions from the Care Act 2014

5.1 This is not intended to be an exhaustive list but an illustrative guide as to the

sort of behaviour or issue which could give rise to a safeguarding concern.

5.1.1 Self-neglect – this covers a wide range of behaviour: neglecting to

care for one’s personal hygiene, health or surroundings and includes behaviour such as hoarding.

In Norwich Pickleball Club this could be a player whose appearance becomes unkempt, does not

wear suitable sports kit and deterioration in hygiene.

5.1.2 Modern Slavery – encompasses slavery, human trafficking, forced labour and domestic

servitude. Traffickers and slave masters use whatever means they have at their disposal to coerce,

deceive and force individuals into a life of abuse, servitude and inhumane treatment. In Norwich

Pickleball Club you may notice that a participant in a team has been missing from practice

sessions and is not responding to reminders from team members or coaches.

5.1.3 Domestic Abuse – including psychological, physical, sexual, financial and emotional

abuse. It also includes so called ‘honor’ based violence. Sport may notice a power imbalance

between a participant and a family member. For example a participant with Downs syndrome may

be looking quiet and withdrawn when their brother comes to collect them from sessions, in

contrast to their personal assistant whom they greet with a smile.

5.1.4 Discriminatory – discrimination is abuse which centers on a difference or

perceived difference particularly with respect to race, gender or disability or any of the protected

characteristics of the Equality Act. This could be the harassing of a club member because they are

or are perceived to be transgender

5.1.5 Organizational Abuse – including neglect and poor care practice within an institution or

specific care setting such as a hospital or care home, for example, or in relation to care provided

in one’s own home. This may range from one off incidents to on-going ill-treatment. It can be

through neglect or poor professional practice as a result of the structure, policies, processes and

practices within an organization. In , this could be training with Norwich Pickleball Club out a

necessary break.

5.1.6 Physical Abuse – includes hitting, slapping, pushing, kicking, misuse of

medication, restraint or inappropriate sanctions.

This could be a coach intentionally striking an athlete.

5.1.7 Sexual Abuse – including rape, indecent exposure, sexual harassment, inappropriate

looking or touching, sexual teasing or innuendo, sexual photography, subjection to pornography

or witnessing sexual acts, indecent exposure and sexual assault or sexual acts to which the adult

has not consented or was pressured into consenting.

This could be a fellow athlete who sends unwanted sexually explicit text messages to a learning

disabled adult they are training alongside.

5.1.8 Financial or Material Abuse – including theft, fraud, internet scamming, coercion in

relation to an adult’s financial affairs or arrangements, including in connection with wills,

property, inheritance or financial transactions, or the misuse or misappropriation of property,

possessions or benefits.

This could be someone taking equipment from an athlete with dementia.

5.1.9 Neglect – including ignoring medical or physical care needs, failure to

provide access to appropriate health social care or educational services, the withholding of the

necessities of life, such as medication, adequate nutrition and heating.

This could be a coach not ensuring athletes have access to water.

5.1.10 Emotional or Psychological Abuse – this includes threats of harm or

abandonment, deprivation of contact, humiliation, blaming, controlling, intimidation, coercion,

harassment, verbal abuse, isolation or withdrawal from services or supportive networks.

This could be an athlete threatening another athlete with physical harm and persistently

blaming them for poor performance.

5.2 Not included in the Care Act 2014 but also relevant:

5.2 Cyber Bullying – cyber bullying occurs when someone repeatedly makes fun

of another person online or repeatedly picks on another person through emails or text messages,

or uses online forums with the intention of harming, damaging, humiliating or isolating another

person. It can be used to carry out many different types of bullying (such as racist bullying,

homophobic bullying, or bullying related to special educational needs and disabilities) but instead

of the perpetrator carrying out the bullying face-to-face, they use technology as a means to do it.

5.2.2 Forced Marriage – forced marriage is a term used to describe a marriage in which one or

both of the parties are married without their consent or against their will. A forced marriage differs

from an arranged marriage, in which both parties consent to the assistance of a third party in

identifying a spouse. The Anti-social Behavior, Crime and Policing Act 2014 make it a criminal

offence to force someone to marry.

5.2.3 Mate Crime – a ‘mate crime’ as defined by the Safety Net Project is ‘when vulnerable

people are befriended by members of the community who go on to exploit and take advantage of

them. It may not be an illegal act but still has a negative effect on the individual.’ Mate Crime is

carried out by someone the adult knows and often happens in private. In recent years there have

been a number of Serious Case Reviews relating to people with a learning disability who were

murdered or seriously harmed by people who purported to be their friend.

5.2.4 Radicalisation – the aim of radicalization is to attract people to their reasoning, inspire new

recruits and embed their extreme views and persuade vulnerable individuals of the legitimacy of

their cause. This may be direct through a relationship, or through social media.

  1. Signs and indicators of abuse and neglect

6.1 Abuse can take place in any context and by all manner of perpetrator.

Abuse may be inflicted by anyone in the club who an athlete comes into contact with. Or club

members, workers, volunteers or coaches may suspect that an athlete is being abused or neglected

outside of the club setting. There are many signs and indicators that may suggest someone is

being abused or neglected, these include but are not limited to:

6.1.1 Unexplained bruises or injuries – or lack of medical attention when an injury is present.

6.1.2 Person has belongings or money going missing.

6.1.3Person is not attending / no longer enjoying their sessions.

6.1.4Someone losing or gaining weight / an unkempt appearance.

6.1.5A change in the behavior or confidence of a person.

6.1.6 They may self-harm.

6.1.7They may have a fear of a particular group or individual.

6.1.8They may tell you / another person they are being abused – i.e. a disclosure.

7 What to do if you have a concern or someone raises concerns with you.

7.1 You may become aware that abuse or poor practice is taking place,

suspect abuse or poor practice may be occurring or be told about something that may be abuse or

poor practice and you must report this to the Lead Norwich Pickleball Club Safeguarding or

Welfare Officer, or, if the Lead Safeguarding or Welfare Officer is implicated then report to the

Norwich Pickleball Club CEO.

7.2 If you are at an international event and have a concern then speak to

the coach or a team official.

7.3 If you are concerned someone is in immediate danger, contact the

police straight away.

7.4 It is important when considering your concern that you also consider

the needs and wishes of the person at risk, taking into account the nature of the alert, more

information on this is given in Appendix 1 ‘The Legislative Framework’.

 

Hazard Consequence Control Measures Probability Severity Risk Score Risk Rank
Car Park Area Slips and Falls Wensum Sports Centre car park may became icy in winter time and extra care is required, Staff will at times salt the area but may take time to work to work from application. 1 5 5 Low
Sports Hall Emergency Session Leader report to Wensum sport staff if on duty, if not take control. First Aid and incident reporting book in reception office.

Other venues will require a revised risk assessment

2 2 4 Low
Sports Hall Fire Session Leader to ensure that members know and abide by the health and safety rules of the venue.

Fire exit and assembly points. to be aware of site procedures in case of emergency.

1 2 2 Low
Courts Slips

Falls

Session Leader to check that courts are free of dust, litter and dry before play. Vee sweep area clean , mop area and check that the court is dry before play. Stop play if sweat on court becomes a hazard and dry area.

No open drinks near the courts.

Chairs are pushed back against the wall, personal bags, pickleball equipment and sports posts not in use to be stored away from play areas and not a trip hazard.

2 2 4 Low
Courts in play Collisions with

players and

paddles

Court etiquette.

Avoid opening doors or gates to courts while in play.

Do not walk or stand behind players while game is in progress.

Do not serve if people are moving behind the receiving team. Avoid running on to courts either side that are in play.

2 2 4 Low
Balls Falls from

standing on the

ball

If a ball lands on a court either side of play call BALL ON COURT and all play stops and replay point

This is reinforced as players are instructed and in game play the game. session leader will insure all players stop play and safely recover of the ball

2 2 4 Low
Balls

 

 

Struck by balls Pickleball can be a fast moving game and being hit by the ball will happen.

Training players to have the paddle in the ready position. and be ready to receive at all times in play.

Damage to spectacles due to ball contact may occur, use of over goggles will reduce the risk.

Eye injury will possibly be higher if using contact lenses or any eye surgery Safety glasses are available on loan from club kit but players should supply their own.

3 2 6 Low
Play Slips ,Trips and

Falls

Only court shoes to be worn on court. Check that the soles are clean and free of stones and that the sole material non marking. 1 2 2 Low
Play Slips ,Trips and

Falls

Training. Avoid running backwards, Session leaders to remind players of the dangers of head injury from falling

backwards.

Contact with posts and net. Playing the ball inside the Non Volley Zone without bouncing is a fault, most play is seven feet from the net and posts. Contact is unlikely, Pickleball

nets are free standing and will move on contact.

Use of badminton posts with lowered net which have a heavy counter weight may not move and fall if colliding with the net, contact with post or net is a foul.

Use pickleball nets whenever possible.

1 5 5 Low
Moving

equipment

Slips ,Trips and

Falls

Net screen is used when mixed sports take place at the same time to prevent balls going on to the adjacent courts.

Distance between court side lines is reduced and extra care required, when possible use for training or drill only.

2 2 4 Low
Courts in play

Separation net

Slips ,Trips and

Falls

Net screen is used when mixed sports take place at the same time to prevent balls going on to the adjacent courts.

Distance between court side lines is reduced and extra care required, when possible use for training or drill only.

2 2 4 Low
Players waiting and Spectators Contact with players or paddles Those not playing on court will keep clear of the base line and not move behind players while the games in play or about to start. Those serving will not do so until it is safe to do so. 3 2 6 Low
Players Chocking Players are discouraged from eating or chewing gum while playing as a fall or contact with their partner may induce choking 1 3 6 Low
Players Sprains, muscles, tendons and bruises. Advice and training. New players are asked if they are fit to play and if they   have any medical conditions which they are aware of. Advise to contact their medical practice if unsure. Warm up slowly and stretch before play. Keep Hydrated. Cool down exercises after play. 3 2 6 Low
Play on outside courts Slips ,Trips and

Falls

Session leaders. Make sure contact can be made with the emergency services if needed, and that they know the postcode and location of the courts.

Check opening times of the Recreation Office if assistance is required and a mobile phone is available for emergencies.

2 2 4 Low
Moving Equipment

Outside courts

  Distance between car park and courts may require assistance to move the equipment and set the nets up 3 3 9 Med
Sun and high temperature Sunburn and dehydration Use high UV sun block on exposed areas

Do not over exercise

Have water available

2 2 4 Low
    Probability x Severity = Risk Score

Risk Score     1 –   8     Low Risk

9 – 12   Medium Risk

12 – 15> High Risk

 

 

Probability               Severity

5   Very High             5 Fatality or Severe Injury

4   High                     4   Major Injury

3   Moderate           3   Requires Medical Attention

2 Slight                     2   Minor Injury (First Aid)

1 Very Low              1     No Personal Injury

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 2 – SEX, ETHNIC AND DISABILITY MONITORING

 

Applicants are requested to tick the relevant boxes below to enable Norwich Pickleball Club to monitor its equal opportunity policy.     Monitoring is recommended by the codes of practice for the elimination of racial discrimination and for the elimination of discrimination on the grounds of sex, marital status and disability. This information is used for no other purpose and will be treated as confidential.

 

Surname: __________________________   Forenames: _______________________________

 

Post Applied for:     ________________________________________________________________

 

Male                 ÿ                      Female ÿ

 

 

Ethnic Group

 

White               ÿ                      Black-Caribbean          ÿ                      Black-African               ÿ

 

 

Black – Other               ÿ          (please specify) _____________________________________

 

Indian              ÿ                      Pakistani          ÿ                      Bangladeshi     ÿ         Chinese           ÿ

 

Other               ÿ                      (please specify)     ___________________________________________

 

Are you disabled?                    Yes      ÿ                      No        ÿ

 

Day-to-day activity affected     _______________________________________________________

 

(please specify)

 

Mobility

 

Manual dexterity

 

Physical co-ordination

 

Continence

 

Ability to lift/carry/move everyday objects

 

Speech/hearing/eyesight

 

Memory/ability to concentrate, learn or understand

 

Perception of the risk of physical danger

 

 

 

Norwich Pickleball Club Information Pack

Code of Conduct

  • Be courteous to all before, during and after the game.
  • Players will accept responsibility for their guests and family members in attendance.
  • Whilst wearing club promotional clothing you are representing the club and should behave appropriately.
  • Any discrimination or harassment will not be tolerated within the club.
  • Alcohol, drugs, or violence will not be tolerated whilst the club is convening.

 

Facilities and equipment

  • Treat the Facility and Equipment with respect.
  • Wear clean court shoes that will not mark the floor.
  • Observe and comply with the rules of the building.
  • Help to keep the courts and building as clean as possible.
  • Treat the balls, nets and paddles responsibly – they are all susceptible to damage beyond normal wear and tear.
  • Never throw your paddle or otherwise purposely mishandle any equipment.

 

Court Etiquette

There are a number of overlaps between Court Etiquette and Health and Safety. Many of the points made are obvious. However in view of their importance we make no apology for making them and indeed some of them are included under both headings.

 

  • Begin each game by acknowledging other players and any referee.
  • It is important that members and visitors associated with the club should, at all times, show respect and understanding for the safety and welfare of others.
  • Play your strongest game against better players but work on skills you need practice against weaker players.
  • Take account of a person’s physical limitations when you play them socially. Good sportsmanship make people better people.
  • Call the score just before serving – it ensures everyone is ready and that everyone agrees the score.
  • As a general rule – a ball that lands either side of the centre line should be taken by the player whose forehand it is.
  • Never yell at, swear at, or say a hostile or sarcastic word in anger to your partner your opponent or a referee.
  • Always put a ball back to another player courteously i.e. with their safety in mind.
  • Do not purposely distract your opponent while a point is being played.
  • Rotate on and off the court in such a manner that everyone has equal playing time.
  • There will not always be enough courts for the number of people attending or there may be odd numbers. When this happens you may be asked to sit out until the next game finishes. Practice skills, referee or play with just 2 people if a court is free. You may be asked to play to a score of 7. 9 or 11 or use a particular rota system to make the playing time fair for all.
  • Remember to apologise for any unintentional direct hit to another player
  • Remember to apologise for an unintentional ‘net’ point
  • Play fairly and encourage other to do so.
  • Make line calls honestly- it is only a game and your house does not depend upon it!!

*   The spirit of the game is as important as the rules.

 

Health and Safety

  • Abide by the Health & Safety Rules of the venue in which the game is being played.
  • Abide by the International Federation Pickleball rules
  • Stretch/warm up before and after play.
  • Be aware of your current physical condition and do not play on if this may be compromised.
  • Beware of dehydration-drink plenty of water before you become thirsty.
  • When a ball comes into your court or when you hear a shout of ‘Ball on Court’ – stop play immediately, and return the ball courteously.
  • When your ball goes into another court shout ‘Ball on Court’ immediately and wait for their play to stop and for them to return the ball to you. Do NOT retrieve the ball yourself.
  • Never walk behind an active court in play – wait until the current point is over before moving.
  • If you see someone who displays signs of dizziness, weakness, or lack of concentration, keep an eye on them. Recommend a time-out if you think it necessary for their safety’s sake.

 

 

  • Do not play if your movement or judgment is impaired by alcohol or drugs
  • You will be expected to wear appropriate footwear and clothing – non marking soles.
  • Be aware at all times of where your partner is on the court. (Learn to call to each other)
  • Good play is to be two arm/paddle lengths away from each other.
  • This lowers the risk of you colliding and/or going for the same shot.
  • Do not dive going for a shot –you or your partner may get injured.
  • Always play in a manner that does not threaten the safety of players on both your own and the adjoining courts.
  • Do not intentionally hit the ball at someone in a manner that could cause injury, particularly to the upper body and/ or head. The club will take action against any player who uses this as a “strategy”.
  • Try to cover a lob from the diagonal and say ‘switch’ to your partner   – agree this safety rule before play.
  • If someone falls on court, ALL play STOPS until they are recovered.

 

Complaints Procedure

  • Members are encouraged to be open at all times and to share any
  • concerns or complaints that they may have about any aspect of the club with any member of the Committee.
  • A formal complaint must be made in writing to the Chairman or Secretary.
  • The Committee will discuss and address the matter fairly and appropriately.
  • The Chairman has the final say.
  • No Committee member will be involved where he/she is the subject of any complaint.

 

Bullying and Harassment Policy.

Norwich Pickleball Club recognize our responsibility to encourage and maintain an environment that is free from bullying or harassment. We will neither permit nor condone bullying or harassment in any form. It is harmful to the club and its members alike. It can subject individuals to fear, stress and anxiety and can lead to illness, accidents and to members leaving. It can also impact badly on safety and the success of Norwich Pickleball Club.

 

Equality and Diversity Policy

Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to celebrating diversity, promoting equality, fostering equal opportunities and tackling discrimination in all it does to ensure that members and guests are treated with respect and valued equally. This means that Norwich Pickleball Club is committed to all its members and guests being treated no less favourably and not unlawfully discriminated against on the grounds of possessing a protected characteristic as defined in The Equality Act 2010. The protected characteristics are; colour, race, nationality, ethnic or national origin, religion or belief, sexual orientation, gender (including gender reassignment), marital/civil partnership status, age, disability or pregnancy. Norwich Pickleball Club will ensure that it complies with all relevant current legislation covering sex discrimination, race relations, disability discrimination, data protection, human rights and equality.

Data Protection Policy

Norwich Pickleball Club is a ‘not for profit’ organization which holds and processes information about members, sponsors and other data subjects for administrative purposes. We are governed by the 1998 Data Protection Act in all we do and are bound by the Data Protection Principles that are set out in the Act.

As a ‘not for profit’ organization, we are not required to ‘notify’ details of data holdings and the purposes of our data processing to the Information Commissioner. Nevertheless, we still need to meet the full requirements of the Data Protection Act in how we hold, care for, use and dispose of your personal information. The Data Controllers for the Club are the Management Committee, each responsible for their own areas. They are advised by and represented in data protection issues by the Club’s Data Protection Officer who is the current Club Secretary.

The purposes for which we hold and process your information are:

  • Managing the membership of new and existing members.
  • Organizing Club events.
  • The management of relevant internal elections.
  • Advertising, marketing and public relations.
  • Accounts and records

 

Waiver, Release of Liability & Assumption of Risk

I HEREBY ACKNOWLEDGE AND AGREE that:

  • I am aware that the information pack of the Norwich Pickleball Club (hereafter referred to as the “NPC”) is set out in the NPC Constitution and is available on the club website and from the secretary.
  • I hereby agree to assume all of the risks and responsibilities arising out of my participation in the activities of NPC, and do for myself, my heirs, and personal representatives hold harmless, indemnify, release and forever discharge the NPC, the committee members and other participants and volunteers, collectively and severally from and against all claims, demands, and actions or causes of action, on account of property damage or loss, physical injury, or death which may occur during, or resulting from my participation in the activities of this club. Specifically I agree not to sue the NPC or its committee in any situation whatsoever that is related to my membership of the club.
  • I fully understand that other members participating with me in the NPC’s pickleball related activities are not responsible for my safety or that of any children, family or friends that I bring to NPC activities.
  • I agree if I am a paying guest or a visitor that is allowed a free session I will be regarded as a temporary member and therefore bound by the contents of this document.
  • I agree that this waiver form shall apply to all NPC’s activities in which I participate and

– need not be brought to my attention each time I participate in the NPC’s activities in order to be                            effective;

– does not have to be signed for each and every NPC activity in which I may participate.

  • I understand that NPC will not permit me to bring a guest or a child on any NPC playing activities unless the guest or a parent (or legal guardian) of the child signs a copy of this Release and Waiver of Liability.
  • I am aware of the nature and effect of this Release of Liability, Waiver of All Possible Claims and Assumption of Risk and am executing this release and waiver of liability agreement freely and voluntarily.
  • I attest that I am physically fit and qualified to participate at the appropriate level in any matches or events that I may play in or enter or be registered for.

 

I acknowledge that I have read this waiver in its entirety, that I understand and fully accept it and that in so doing I am now paying my membership subscription or guest fee or signing as a non fee paying visitor

 

Name …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Address: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………… Post Code …………………………………………..

 

MOB ………………………………………………………. Land Line …………………………………………….

 

email……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Do you have any medical condition that might impact your play:

 

 

 

Are you willing for you photograph to be share on social media Yes / No

 

Amount paid:   £

 

Signature:…………………………………..             Date: …………………………..

 

Received by:                                             Membership Number: ……………….